Our people, our Vision

Vision Super has enough members to fill the MCG, and we know each of you has a unique story to tell. Inspired by the famous ‘Humans of New York’ Facebook page we decided to introduce ourselves to some of our members in person and share their stories and pictures with other members.

Our community and our members are at the centre of everything we do, so it’s great to hear about who they are, what they value, what their lives are like, and their hopes and fears. It’s not just inspirational, it’s also a great way to stay connected to the people we work for every day.

To meet more of our members, keep checking our Facebook page over the coming months. To be featured, send us an email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Jade

Jade

“I worked as a paralegal for a few years, but I just burnt out. I much prefer my work for the council, it’s a chance to give back to my community and feel good about what I am doing.

This job is more family orientated, it allowed me to have a family, and at the end of the day, that’s why we work – for ourselves and our families. I want to make a comfortable life for my kids and I hope they can have some stability in their lives."
Abdulhakim

Abdulhakim

“I started here as a work experience student and never left! I appreciate the opportunity I have here.

I guess I became an engineer because I was curious as to how things worked. Like any study, engineering can be challenging but it’s nice that it paid-off and I can work here and have some security.

I’m looking forward to my future in this career and I’m just going to see where it will take me next.”
Andrew

Andrew

“I think it’s human to not want to face the facts. You feel 32 inside and then suddenly you’re 54 and retirement isn’t that far away! I have now discovered that super isn’t as complicated or as daunting as I imagined.

With all the information that’s available online, and the fact that I can check on my super just by logging in…it makes me think ‘Crikey - why didn’t I do this earlier!’

I am glad that I’ve finally sorted my super out though. It’s nice to have confidence in my retirement plan.”
Bruce

Bruce

“I look after the mowing of all the parks and gardens in this area. I’ve been working here for 27 years… because I don’t want to get a real job! No, but really, I’ve stayed here all this time because I like the people.

When I’m not here, I’m fishing. If money was no object, I’d fish all day. I’ve got a wife and three daughters at home - I’ve got to get on the water sometimes and escape!”
Colin

Colin

"When I was in the police academy the law instructor asked each recruit how long we intended staying in the job. One after the other, the 24 recruits said 'Oh, until I retire or 30 to 40 years or so.' My answer was 20 years.

The inspector looked quizzically at me and asked me 'Why 20 years?' I answered 'Well by then I will be 39 and still young enough to do something else.' I was wrong though I stayed in that job for 20 years and 1 day!"
Nina

Nina

"When I was a teenager at the supermarket checkout, it was all about earning that pay cheque and spending it immediately, but now I want to think about the longer term. I’m really trying to improve my financial literacy and I know a little bit about super, but everything I’ve learned has been from asking my family a lot of questions.

I’m quite disappointed, maybe even a bit angry that we never learned about super and tax in school. I can only imagine how difficult it would be for someone without any access to help, and I worry that they wouldn’t know their rights and entitlements. I think there needs to be more emphasis on helping young people and women become financially literate."
Sara

Sara

"When I moved to Australia, I remember being in awe of the city lights at night. Where I came from in Samoa there weren’t many street lights around the place.

My daughter’s childhood is so different to what mine was. So much of her world revolves around electronics and being indoors, whereas when I was a kid, I was always playing outside.

My daughter and I go back to Samoa and visit my family every now and again. She was born here, and the first time I brought her to Samoa she was amazed. It was like my reaction to the Sydney lights but reversed - she couldn’t get over the fact that there were just chickens, pigs and dogs just roaming around!"
Lou

Lou

“I think I’ve done my time so I’m retiring in about a year. I’m going to move to Queensland and get some sunshine with the wife. I’m over the cold and keen to see my mates up north.

Working in your community is important, I’ve worked for councils all my life and I’ve been blessed with the work I’ve done here. The people are good, and they’re all trying to do the best they can for our community.
Dolphy

Dolphy

“Previous to this, I worked in sales and marketing, and before that I was in the food industry for a long time. I was a pastry chef that was allergic to flour, so for health reasons and everything, it was time for a change. I did some casual work and long story short, I ended up here.

I like the conditions here. You know what your job is, and you’ve got the freedom of how you do it without someone looking over your shoulder. I tend to work better like that, with an element of trust between myself and my employer.

When I’m not working, I like oil painting and public speaking, doing a bit of gardening and reading. I hope retirement is more of the same.”
Paul

Paul

"I’ve always lived in the western suburbs of Melbourne, and when I was growing up my parents instilled a sense of pride in living in the west. We had a backyard, trees and parks just like anyone else in any other Melbourne suburbs. We had everything that they had.

I was educated in the area, went through university, and it’s catered for all my needs. I’ve heard it described like a sense of tribalism. And it’s weird – I’ve worked outside the west for a while – maybe five years, but I was always keen to get back to the west again. It’s just that sense of being able to give something back to the community.

They say it’s something in you, you’re either a person that wants to work for an organisation that helps the community, or you want to work for an organisation that’s there for profit. I’ve always found myself drawn to the organisations that work for the community."
Vikki and Rebecca

Vikki and Rebecca

Vikki: "I’ve been working in councils for 30 years, serving the community. Rebecca’s been working with me at this council for about 17 years."

Rebecca: "I don’t usually tell people here she’s my mum, or that I live with her, but to be honest, we don’t mind working and living together. We’re only living together until she’s in a nursing home though!"
Joe

Joe

"I couldn’t do office work or shift work. I just get too tired of that kind of thing. I’m happy to be here, working in a hands-on job. It keeps me going, keeps me fit and motivated.

I want my kids to be able to do whatever job makes them happy. If they end up doing something like this, then so be it – but I would prefer that they did something less hands-on."
 

 

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