Unit Prices

View the latest unit prices for our investment options, and find out a little more about how unit pricing works.

The unit prices for investment options held in an accumulation (or ‘super’) account and transition to retirement (or ‘non-commutable income stream’ (NCAP)) account are calculated differently to the unit prices for investment options held in an account based pension (retirement pension) account, because investment earnings on retirement pension options are untaxed.

Unit prices are dollar values that reflect the value of the assets or investments within each Investment option.

  1. Unit prices for SUPER and NCAP options are shown net of tax on investment earnings, net of the reserving margin, and all investment fees and costs, including transaction costs.
  2. Unit prices for RETIREMENT PENSION options are show net of reserving margins and all investment fees and costs, including transaction costs.

Unit prices are usually set each Victorian business day and are published the following business day about 7pm.

Find a unit price

You can find a unit price by selecting an “Option name” from the first dropdown. To refine your selections, add “Account type” or select a “Date” or date range. The table will refresh automatically. 

Important notes
  1. Super account types include Vision Super Saver, Vision Personal and Non-commutable account based Pensions (NCAPS from 1 July 2017).
  2. Pension account types are Account based retirement pensions other than Non-commutable account based pensions.
  3. Unit prices for each Victorian business day are based on the most recently available information for that day, including market close prices for the domestic market and all applicable international markets.
  4. Buy-sell spreads are currently nil for all Vision Super investment options.
    This is based on the current level and pattern of member transactions and the current level of transaction costs incurred by our Investment managers. Currently, transactions costs are reflected in all unit price calculations and are not recovered, partly or wholly, through the application of buy-sell spreads when units are bought and sold. If circumstances change, Vision Super may apply buy-sell spreads to ensure transaction costs that result from member transactions are recovered fairly and equitably from relevant members engaging in the member transaction

What are unit prices?

Unit prices are dollar values that reflect the value of each unit of your investment at any time. They are similar in concept to share prices, in that their value can go up or down each day reflecting the changes in the value of the assets you have chosen to invest in.

Unit prices are calculated as at the end of each Victorian business day and are usually published the following business day at about 7pm.  Unit prices for each Victorian business day are based on the most recently available information for that day, including market close prices for the domestic market and all applicable international markets. Unit prices were first introduced to Vision Super 10 July 2006 at which time buy-sell spreads applied.

What is a buy-sell spread?

Member transactions may require assets held by Vision Super to be purchased or sold. These asset transactions generally incur transaction costs. Buy-sell spreads may be used to recover the estimated transaction costs that result from member transactions from relevant members.

The buy-sell spread is the difference between the buy price and the sell price of units. Any buy sell spread is an additional cost to you. No part of the buy sell spread is paid to the Fund or any external investment manager. 

Buy-sell spreads are currently nil for all Vision Super investment options but this may change.

Details of the possible range of buy-sell spreads can be found in our Fees and costs guide:

 

Frequently asked questions

We’re required to have Target Market Determinations under the Treasury Laws Amendment (Design and Distribution Obligations and Product Intervention Powers) Act 2019.

This is to make sure we’re keeping members at the centre of our approach to the design and distribution of our financial products.

This legislation requires financial services product issuers to design products that are appropriate for the consumers in the target market and consistent with their objectives, financial situation, and needs.

A Target Market Determination is a document which describes who a product is appropriate for (target market), and any conditions around how the product can be distributed to customers. 

It also describes the events or circumstances where we may need to review the Target Market Determination for a financial product.

Cash investment options are generally a combination of money in the bank and money invested for a short time in money market securities, such as bank term deposits and bank bills.

If you are risk averse or working to a short timeframe, then a Cash option that typically provides stable, low risk returns may be suitable for you. This type of investment option will protect the value of your superannuation, but the returns will often be low compared with other investment options.

The risk associated with cash investments is generally minimal, although the returns are also minimal. Cash can be a safe haven in times of economic uncertainty, and occasionally you may wish to preserve capital by allocating some of your super to cash.

We recommend that you obtain financial advice before making any decisions about investing in our Cash option.

To book an appointment with a Vision Super financial planner, either call us or complete our online appointment form:

Go to the form to book an appointment online >

Call our Contact Centre on 1300 300 820 (Monday to Friday 8:30am to 5pm).

Advice fees may apply, which will be discussed with you before any work is undertaken.

We don’t charge switching fees, so there is no impact on your super account balance from switching between investment options. However, if you have the right investment risk profile and your investments are matched up to your risk profile, you shouldn’t be needing to make switches regularly.

From time to time you should review your risk profile, maybe when you are first starting out in the workforce, are in the middle of your working life, a few years away from retirement and/or going into retirement. Otherwise the investments you have in superannuation should be a ‘set and forget’ strategy where you ride the ups and downs of the investments over a longer period.

You can switch investment options for some, or all, of your account balance, future contributions, or both. You can also nominate which investment option you would like your withdrawals to be made from.

You can switch between investment options by logging into our website, or the Vision Super app, or by sending us a completed Investment choice form. You can also call us, on 1300 300 820 (Monday to Friday 8:30am to 5pm).

Investment switches are processed based on the unit prices of the relevant investment options declared on the next business day after we receive your switching request, unless there is a delay with processing due to abnormal market conditions or system failure.

Frequent switching between investment options and trying to second-guess the market can be risky, particularly for high-risk investment options designed to be held in the long-term (6-12 years). You should switch only after a thorough review of your long-term investment strategy.

We recommend that you obtain financial advice before making any decisions about switching between investment options.

To book an appointment with a Vision Super financial planner, either call us or complete our online appointment form:

Go to the form to book an appointment online >

Call our Contact Centre on 1300 300 820 (Monday to Friday 8:30am to 5pm).

Advice fees may apply, which will be discussed with you before any work is undertaken. For full details on advice costs, please refer to the Vision Super Fees and Costs guide.

Growth assets are higher risk but offer a higher potential return compared to defensive assets. They aim to grow the capital that’s invested and provide some income. Defensive assets are lower-risk investments which aim to protect the capital invested while providing an income.

The classification of assets into either growth or defensive has the advantage of simplicity, but it also has limitations when used as an indicator of risk. The classification does not capture diversification, which can have a larger impact on reducing the overall portfolio risk when assets are combined.

Another issue is that different people may have different classifications for the same asset type because there are no regulations governing this area and no clear guidance by the regulators on a standardised growth/defensive split. Classifications of growth or defensive assets may also change over time depending on market conditions and pricing.

We believe that there needs to be greater consistency and transparency in how super funds arrive at their growth/defensive mixes. But in the absence of regulations, there are going to be differences in practice and opinion. To avoid any potential misunderstandings, Vision Super does not publish the growth/defensive split of our investment options.

Compound interest is the interest that is earned on money that was previously earned as interest.

For example, if you have an investment of $100 that pays interest of 5% every year, then in the first year you will be paid interest of $5 over the year (5% of $100).

What happens in the next year? That’s where compounding comes in. You will not only earn interest on your initial $100 deposit, you will also earn interest on the $5 interest that you earned in the first year.

That means you will earn $5.25 in the second next year because your account balance is now $105, even though you didn’t make any deposits. This may not seem like much of an increase, but the effects of compounding becomes  more dramatic over long periods of time. After 30 years, your initial $100 investment would be worth $432.19, and that year you would be paid $21.61 in interest.

Each year your interest earnings will accelerate even more due to compound interest. This cycle leads to interest and account balances going up at an increasing rate, which is sometimes known as exponential growth.

Of course, if you’re borrowing money, compounding works against you. You owe interest on the money you have borrowed, and so your loan balance can then increase over time, even if you don’t borrow any more money.

Already a Vision Super member?

The great news is you can now open your pension account online through the secure site.

Not a Vision Super member?

You’ll just need to open a Vision Personal account first and then you can transfer across to a Vision Super pension.